2019 Mathematics Survey Questionnaire Results

As part of the 2019 NAEP mathematics assessment, students, teachers, and school administrators at grades 4 and 8 answered survey questionnaires. These questionnaires provide information about students’ demographic characteristics, educational experiences, and opportunities to learn mathematics-related knowledge and skills both inside and outside the classroom. Findings are presented for individual survey questions, as well as for indices composed of a set of related survey questions that measure particular topics of interest. Selected 2019 NAEP mathematics survey questionnaire results are highlighted below for: students’ Internet access and digital technology at home; content emphasis or coursetaking in mathematics; students’ confidence in their mathematics knowledge and skills; and teachers’ satisfaction and views of school resources.

The highlighted findings demonstrate the range of information available from the 2019 NAEP mathematics survey questionnaires. They do not provide a complete picture of students' learning experiences inside and outside of school. The NAEP mathematics student, teacher, and school questionnaire data can be explored further using the NAEP Data Explorer. Explore the 2019 NAEP mathematics student (grade 4 | grade 8), teacher (grade 4 | grade 8), and school (grade 4 | grade 8) questionnaires.* Learn more about the development of NAEP survey questions and indices.

NAEP survey questionnaire responses provide additional information for understanding NAEP performance results. Although comparisons in students' performance are made based on student, teacher, and school characteristics and educational experiences, these results cannot be used to establish a cause-and-effect relationship between the characteristics or experiences and student achievement. NAEP is not designed to identify the causes of performance differences. Therefore, results must be interpreted with caution. There are many factors that may influence average student achievement, including local educational policies and practices, the quality of teachers, available resources, and the demographic characteristics of the student body. Such factors may change over time and vary among student groups.

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* The 2019 NAEP teacher and school questionnaires cover three subjects: reading, mathematics, and science.

Interpreting the Results
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NAEP reports results using widely accepted statistical standards; findings are reported based on a statistical significance level set at .05 with appropriate adjustments for multiple comparisons. Students are always used as the unit of analysis when reporting NAEP survey questionnaire responses. The percentages shown are weighted and represent students or students whose teachers or school administrators indicated a specific response on the survey questionnaire. Some student responses are missing due to the inability to link students to their teacher’s or school administrator's responses to the survey questionnaire or due to nonresponse from students, teachers, or school administrators. The denominator of the percentages presented excludes all students with missing information in data for the analysis. To find missing rates, use the NAEP Data Explorer.

Students' Internet Access and Digital Technology at Home
Eighty-one percent of fourth-grade students in 2019 had Internet access and a computer or tablet at home

In 2019, eighty-one percent of all fourth-grade students in the nation (excluding Puerto Rico) reported that they had both Internet access and a computer or tablet that they could use at home. Grade 4 students who reported having both Internet access and a computer or tablet at home had a higher mathematics score on average (245) than those who reported having only Internet access (234), only a computer or tablet (223), or neither (226) at home.

Percentage of fourth-grade students assessed in NAEP mathematics, by whether they have Internet access and digital devices available at home for them to use: 2019

The percentages of fourth-graders who reported having both Internet access and a computer or tablet at home in 2019 varied across states/jurisdictions and across participating TUDA districts. While 81 percent of grade 4 public school students in the nation reported having both Internet access and a computer or tablet at home, across states/jurisdictions (excluding Puerto Rico), the percentages of grade 4 public school students who reported having both resources at home ranged between 70 and 87 percent. While 79 percent of grade 4 students in large city public schools reported having both Internet access and a computer or tablet at home, across TUDA districts, the percentages of grade 4 public school students who reported having both resources at home ranged between 68 and 89 percent. To see detailed results by state/jurisdiction and by TUDA district, use the NAEP Data Explorer tables linked below.

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Content Emphasis or Coursetaking in Mathematics
Teachers of higher-performing fourth-grade students placed heavy emphasis on measurement, geometry, and algebra in class

The chart below shows the percentages of fourth-grade students by the level of emphasis their teachers placed on five mathematics content areas in class. Percentages are compared between lower-performing students (scoring below the 25th percentile) and higher-performing students (scoring at or above the 75th percentile) on the 2019 NAEP mathematics assessment. Note that not all emphasis categories are shown for each mathematics content area.

Compared to lower-performing students, a larger percentage of higher-performing students at grade 4 had teachers who reported placing heavy emphasis on measurement (32 percent versus 28 percent), geometry (36 percent versus 31 percent), and algebra and functions (60 percent versus 57 percent).

Percentage of fourth-grade students assessed in NAEP mathematics whose teachers reported placing heavy emphasis on various content areas of mathematics, by percentiles: 2019

* Significantly different (p < .05) from students performing at or above the 75th percentile.

The percentages of fourth-graders whose teachers placed heavy emphasis on the five mathematics content areas in class varied across states/jurisdictions and across participating TUDA districts. For example, in 2019, sixty percent of grade 4 public school students in the nation had teachers who reported placing heavy emphasis on algebra and functions. Across states/jurisdictions (excluding Puerto Rico), the percentages of grade 4 public school students whose teachers reported placing heavy emphasis on this content area ranged between 39 and 75 percent. In 2019, sixty-four percent of grade 4 students in large city public schools had teachers who reported placing heavy emphasis on algebra and functions. Across TUDA districts, the percentages of grade 4 public school students whose teachers reported placing heavy emphasis on this content area ranged between 38 and 86 percent. To see detailed results by state/jurisdiction and by TUDA district for the full list of mathematics content areas, use the NAEP Data Explorer tables linked below.

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Confidence in Mathematics Knowledge and Skills
Higher average scores for fourth-graders who were more confident in their ability to do mathematics-related tasks

Fourth-grade students answered questions about their confidence in performing a variety of mathematics-related tasks, such as estimating the weight of five apples using pounds, or finding the amount of carpet needed to cover a floor if its length and width are known. Students’ responses to these questions can be combined to create an index that focuses on their confidence in their mathematics knowledge and skills.

In 2019, fifty-three percent of all fourth-grade students in the nation reported low to moderate levels of confidence in their mathematics knowledge and skills. Grade 4 students who reported higher levels of confidence in their mathematics knowledge and skills had a higher mathematics score on average than those who reported lower levels of confidence.

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Teachers' Satisfaction and Views of School Resources
Teachers’ views of the quality of their schools and resources varied across states and jurisdictions and across districts

As part of the 2019 mathematics assessment, teachers of fourth-grade students answered questions about their satisfaction with being a teacher. In 2019, five percent of fourth-grade public school students in the nation had teachers who reported that the statement, “I am frustrated as a teacher at my school” described them exactly. Across states/jurisdictions (excluding Puerto Rico), the percentages of grade 4 public school students whose teachers reported this response ranged between 2 and 10 percent. In 2019, six percent of fourth-grade students in large city public schools had teachers who reported that the statement, “I am frustrated as a teacher at my school” described them exactly. Across TUDA districts, the percentages of grade 4 public school students whose teachers reported this response ranged between 1 and 12 percent.

Teachers also answered questions about their views on the physical status of their schools and resources. In 2019, six percent of fourth-grade public school students in the nation had teachers who reported that school buildings in need of significant repair were a serious problem. Ten percent of fourth-grade public school students in the nation had teachers who reported that overcrowded classrooms were a serious problem. Finally, six percent of fourth-grade public school students in the nation had teachers who reported that a lack of adequate instructional materials and supplies was a serious problem. Teachers’ views about the physical status of their schools and resources also varied across states/jurisdictions and across participating TUDA districts. For example, across states/jurisdictions (excluding Puerto Rico), the percentages of grade 4 public school students whose teachers reported that overcrowded classrooms were a serious problem ranged between 4 and 25 percent. In 2019, twelve percent of fourth-grade students in large city public schools had teachers who reported that overcrowded classrooms were a serious problem. Across TUDA districts, the percentages of grade 4 public school students whose teachers reported this response ranged between 2 and 31 percent. To see detailed results by state/jurisdiction and by TUDA district, use the NAEP Data Explorer tables linked below.

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